Relapse Prevention Strategies to Use in Time of Crisis

Relapse is when a person reverts to using addictive substances after time spent in treatment and/or recovery. Because relapse can be so dangerous, it’s important that, during treatment, individuals are prepared for what to expect with a relapse, how to identify the relapse process and learn about things to do to prevent relapse. Relapse prevention strategies are things people can do when they know that relapse may be in their future in order to protect their health and their recovery. Knowing about relapse prevention strategies can help to save lives, so people in treatment or recovery must learn and adopt these strategies into their daily lives.

Some examples of relapse prevention strategies include:

Use Mindfulness to Accept Cravings

Mindfulness is the act of living in the present moment and accepting challenges as they come rather than worrying about them happening in the future or focusing on past challenges. During recovery, you’re going to run into challenges such as cravings. So, it’s helpful to utilize mindfulness to take every moment one at a time. This way, you can accept that you’re dealing with a challenge like experiencing a craving, understand that is something that will come and go, and eventually move on. This practice is assistive because it doesn’t neglect the fact that challenges will occur it faces challenges head-on. Therefore, helping people learn how to overcome adversity and overcome challenges they face during recovery rather than keeping them in the shadows, hoping that they won’t occur.

Listening to Your Body and Giving it What it Needs

During active addiction, our bodies tell us one thing – they need addictive substances. So, it can be a challenge in recovery for people to take care of what their bodies need as they may not have been taking the best care of themselves during active addiction – as addiction has muted this sense of self-care. But, being able to give your body what it needs is crucial to recovery success. Therefore, it can be helpful to learn how to understand what our bodies are asking for and give it what it need to maintain healthy function and fight the good fight of recovery. Some examples of listening to our bodies and taking care of them can be feeding ourselves when we’re hungry, getting enough sleep every night, exercising, and reaching out to support when we feel lonely.

Use Grounding Plan of Actions

Grounding is when you use your senses to evoke a sense of mindfulness and stay in the present moment in order to accept and overcome powerful emotions like those that may come during relapse. So, it can be helpful to understand how to use grounding strategies when you’re experiencing a challenging situation during recovery. Some types of grounding techniques can include:

  • taking off your shoes and feeling the ground on your feet and toes
  • smelling the air outside
  • going outside and identifying things you can see that you think are beautiful
  • feeling things that are around you for different textures
  • tasting your favorite snacks

Using your senses can help you practice mindfulness as this forces you to focus on the present moment. When you can get through this exact moment, you can get through the next one.

Here at Lotus Healing, we give folks living with substance use disorder the tools needed to obtain and sustain sobriety. And, offer a number of helpful therapy and supportive outlets to guide them on their recovery journey.

Learn about our outpatient services and providers like Adam Freilich, LADC, right from our website.

 

Dr. Dixie Brown is a PhD level Therapist, Integrative Medicine Practitioner, and Nutritionist with 15 years of experience working in Mental Health, specifically with trauma, eating disorders, and substance use.

Dixie Brown

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Lotus Healing helps substance use and mental health providers, foundations, organizations and healthcare companies address urgent healthcare challenges that impact their ability to provide high quality healthcare to vulnerable populations by prioritizing organizational leadership, structure, education and research and commitment to improved organizational wellbeing.

Lotus Healing helps substance use and mental health providers, foundations, organizations and healthcare companies address urgent healthcare challenges that impact their ability to provide high quality healthcare to vulnerable populations by prioritizing organizational leadership, structure, education and research and commitment to improved organizational wellbeing.

Lotus Healing helps substance use and mental health providers, foundations, organizations and healthcare companies address urgent healthcare challenges that impact their ability to provide high quality healthcare to vulnerable populations by prioritizing organizational leadership, structure, education and research and commitment to improved organizational wellbeing.

Lotus Healing helps substance use and mental health providers, foundations, organizations and healthcare companies address urgent healthcare challenges that impact their ability to provide high quality healthcare to vulnerable populations by prioritizing organizational leadership, structure, education and research and commitment to improved organizational wellbeing.

Lotus Healing helps substance use and mental health providers, foundations, organizations and healthcare companies address urgent healthcare challenges that impact their ability to provide high quality healthcare to vulnerable populations by prioritizing organizational leadership, structure, education and research and commitment to improved organizational wellbeing.